Special Event: Beyond the Hype – Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Worldwide

stratasys-factoryWe are pleased and honored to announce a special event that PADT is sponsoring with the Colorado Society of Manufacturing Engineers.  Terry Wholers, a leading voice in the additive manufacturing space, is giving a presentation on the current state of all things AM.  The event is being held at the world famous New Belgium Brewery in Fort Collins, Colorado on September 15, 2015.

Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Worldwide

Cut through the hype and hear about real world applications for additive manufacturing and 3D printing:

  • Where is the industry growth?
  • Which types of polymers and metals are used in 3D printing?
  • What are practical uses for the technology in the engineering environment?
  • What are current industry implementations for AM/3D printing?
  • How is it being implemented in industry today?
  • What kind of parts can be manufactured for final products?
  • How important is the design process?
  • What are the most common myths and misconceptions?
  • What does the future hold?

If your company is thinking about how to practically introduce AM into your design/workflow/manufacturing process, this presentation is for you. Ask questions, discuss business opportunities, and speak in depth about the future.

terry-whohlersMr. Wohlers will highlight recent developments and growth trends that point to where the industry is headed and what the future holds. New products and services are being introduced at an astounding rate. Mr. Wohlers will sort through the maze of choices and opportunities associated with the methods used for rapid product development and additive manufacturing (AM).

Here is the agenda:

4:00 – Brew Tour of New Belgium Brewery –Must RSVP– only 16 spots available!
5:00 – Packaging tour of New Belgium Brewery –Must RSVP– only 48 spots available!
5:30 – 6:30 – Meet, Greet and Network
6:30 – Light Dinner Buffet – Must RSVP for buffet and presentation
7:00 – Presentation by Mr. Terry Wohlers
8:00 – Networking (meet Terry)
9:00 – End of event

new-belgium-brewReservations are accepted through Friday, September 11th, so please register now!
Cost of the event is $20 but is FREE if you mention PADT when you register.

To register please email reservations@sme354.org or
call Chuck Otoupalik at 303-678-8414

Sponsored by:

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StratasysLogo

Alignex-logo

 

 

About Terry Wohlers

Terry Wohlers, founder of Wohlers Associates, Inc., a 28-year old independent consulting firm. Wohlers and his team have provided consulting assistance to more than 240 organizations in 24 countries, as well as to 150+ companies in the investment community. He has authored 400 books, articles, and technical papers and has given 125 keynote presentations on five continents. Wohlers has twice served as a featured speaker at events held at the White House. He is a principal author of the Wohlers Report, wholers-logothe undisputed industry-leading study on additive manufacturing and 3D printing for 20 consecutive years.

Here is what industry experts have to say about Mr. Wohlers and his company’s industry report:

“Why waste time and money when you can get a worldwide overview of additive manufacturing from Wohlers Associates-experts that have focused on AM for 26 years. The Wohlers Report is worth every dollar.”

Peter Sander, Vice President, Airbus Germany

“Now in its 18th year of publication (that’s right all you 3-D printing arrivistes, this stuff has been around for a while), the annual report describes a healthy and growing market for 3-D printing equipment, services, materials and processes, albeit one where the value continues to accrue to industrial applications.”

Michael Copeland, Senior Editor, WIRED

“The amount of information in the report is almost overwhelming. I am awed by its depth and breadth. What’s more, the information is not available anywhere else. For example, we hear how China is changing, but few people fully understand the transformation that’s underway. The report gives insight and clarification on China and it covers the rest of the world with the same careful analysis. It also provides insight into new products and applications that you normally would not hear about, such as light-weight structures, nanomanufacturing, growing organs, gaming, and new types of protective gear. One of the secrets of your success is the extensive travel worldwide, coupled with the information you seek from experts globally. Thank you for making something so remarkable available each year.”

Boris Fritz, Northrop Grumman

“If you need to know anything about where this technology is today or where it is going tomorrow, Wohlers Report is your guide.”

Anthony J. Lockwood, former editorial director, Desktop Engineering

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Press Release: Southern California Expansion Grows PADT’s ANSYS Product Development Software Distribution Business

PADT-CA-License-PlatePalm trees and movie stars.  Endless beaches and deserts that fade to the horizon.  Aerospace companies, world class universities, med device developers, and toy manufacturers.  Oil, freeways, and big construction. Southern California. A place larger and more diverse than most countries in the world.  PADT has done work in the area since our first weeks in business. As our business continued to grow, our customers started asking when we were opening up a local office, but the time never seemed right. Until now.

PADT is pleased to announce that we will be loading furniture and computers in a truck and head on the I-10 to Torrance, California where we will open up a new office.  ANSYS, Inc. has expanded our sales territory to include small and medium sized new accounts in the Southern California area.  The focus of this new office will be building that business.

You can read the official details in the press release below, or the PDF here.  As usual, we want to share some more informal information with our blog readers.

The office will be started with an engineer and a salesperson who have been with us for a while, and another pair that we are hiring locally. This combination of company experience and local knowledge should get us going quickly. Over time, the plan is to grow the Torrance office, and add at least two more. Long term we would like to have between 3 and 10 employees per office in Southern California.

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Our team will conduct training and seminars from this office and use it as a base to spread the word on simulation driven product development across Southern California. The initial focus for sales will be on small and medium sized businesses that are currently not using ANSYS products, that want to work with a technical sales and support team who can provide more than the software tool – customers who want a partner who can also help them apply the tools effectively. The dense hotbeds of engineering along the coast will be an obvious area of concentration. We also aim to represent the value of ANSYS products in less visited areas of the region, including the high deserts, “in-between” towns, and inland locations beyond LA, Orange County, and San Diego.

PADT-CA-LA-PostCard

The good news is that we are not starting from scratch. This first office is right down the street from the California campus of PADT’s largest and oldest customer.  We also have over one hundred customers who have used PADT for simulation services, training, rapid prototyping, and product development, and we will be reaching out to them shortly to start building our local network even further.  And then, our new employees who we will hire locally will be contacting their network as well.

Before the end of the summer we hope to have a grand opening event, as well as several seminars that will continue through the end of the year. If you live in the area and want to be invited, visit here to register as someone who want to be on the California contact list.

This blog and social media will be used to post our progress. The entire sales and technical team is looking forward to meeting everyone in the area in the coming months.

If you have any questions or suggestions for us, please contact us.  Our standard number 480.813.4884 works for all of our offices.

Below is a copy of the press release, or you can view the “official” version here.

Press Release:

Southern California Expansion Grows PADT’s ANSYS Product Development Software Distribution Business

PADT opens Torrance office to provide consultant-focused ANSYS Product Sales and Support for small and medium sized engineering businesses in the region

Tempe, Ariz., August 24, 2015 —Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) the Southwest’s largest provider of Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D Printing services and products, today announced the addition of Southern California to its ANSYS, Inc. Product Sales and Support territory. PADT is a long time ANSYS Channel Partner who has built a reputation for outstanding technical abilities and customer support in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada. The company is now taking the same customer focused approach to selling and supporting the world’s leading product development simulation tools from ANSYS to new customers in Southern California.

“We are honored by ANSYS’ trust in PADT and are eager to start working more closely with their team in Southern California,” said Bob Calvin, PADT’s manager of Simulation Sales. “We have been doing business in this area since PADT was founded 21 years ago. Expanding our offering to include ANSYS products and support is something that makes sense for users, ANSYS and PADT.”

Located in Torrance California, PADT’s new office will be staffed by two sales people and two application engineers.  Aggressive growth will follow.

“We selected Torrance for our new Southern California office because it’s centrally located, easily accessible and right down the street from the California campus of our largest customer,” said Ward Rand, co-owner, PADT. “Having staff with real world industry experience located nearby will strengthen our ability to drive our customer’s product development process, resulting in higher quality products, improved performance and lower costs.”

PADT will open additional offices across the Southern California region in the coming two years with the long term goal of three total offices with three to ten employees each.  The location of these offices, just like the initial Torrance facility, will be chosen to provide service where the demand is greatest.

The ANSYS Channel Partner program is unique in the industry because it allows customers the option to purchase software and support from ANSYS directly, or from highly technical local consulting companies like PADT. Since Southern California has not had an ANSYS Channel Partner for thirteen years, PADT’s engineering experience and ANSYS product expertise will be a tremendous help to small and medium sized companies seeking to discover the power of ANSYS products, and efficiently implement Simulation Driven Product Development (SDPD).

Events, both on-line and face-to-face, will be announced in the coming months to celebrate the arrival of PADT in the area. Those interested in following PADT’s progress, can subscribe to any of the company’s social media outlets, PADT California emails, or visit the new PADT California web page (www.padtinc.com/socal). Anyone needing immediate information can contact PADT at info@padtinc.com or call 480.813.4884.

About Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and Rapid Prototyping solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work.” With over 75 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters at the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Murray, Utah, as well as through staff members located around the country. More information on PADT can be found at http://www.PADTINC.com.

# # #

Company contact: 
Eric Miller
PADT
480.813.4884
eric.miller@padtinc.com

Media contact:
Linda Capcara
TechTHiNQ
480-229-7090
linda.capcara@techthinq.com

PADT-CA-Beach-Sunset

#padt-socal

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CoresOnDemand: Helping Engineers Do Their Magic

CoresOnDemand-Logo-120hEngineers Do Magic

In the world of simulation there are two facts of life. First, the deadline of “yesterday would be good” is not too uncommon. Funding deadlines, product roll-out dates, as well as unexpected project requirements are all reliable sources for last minute changes. Engineers are required to do quality work and deliver reliable results in limited time and resources. In essence perform sorcery.

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Second, the size and complexity of models can vary wildly. Anything from fasteners and gaskets to complete systems or structures can be in the pipeline. Engineers can be looking at any combination of hundreds of variables that impact the resources required for a successful simulation.

Required CPU cores, RAM per core, interconnect speeds, available disk space, operating system and ANSYS version all vary depending on the model files, simulation type, size, run-time and target date for the results.

Engineers usually do magic. But sometimes limited time or resources that are out of reach can delay on-time delivery of project tasks.

At PADT, We Can Help

PADT Inc. has been nostrils deep in engineering services and simulation products for over 20 years. We know engineering, we know how to simulate engineering and we know ANSYS very well. To address the challenges our customers are facing, in 2015 PADT introduced CoresOnDemand to the engineering community.

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CoresOnDemand offers the combination of our proven CUBE cluster, ANSYS simulation tools and the PADT experience and support as an on demand simulation resource. By focusing on the specific needs of ANSYS users, CoresOnDemand was built to deliver performance and flexibility for the full range of applications. Specifics about the clusters and their configurations can be found at CoresOnDemand.com.

CoresOnDemand is a high performance computing environment purpose built to help customers address numerical simulation needs that require compute power that isn’t available or that is needed on a temporary basis.

Call Us We’re Nice

CoresOnDemand is a new service in the world of on-demand computing. Prospective customers just need to give us a call or send us an inquiry here to get all of their questions answered. The engineers behind CoresOnDemand have a deep understanding of the ANSYS tools and distributed computing and are able to asses and properly size a compute environment that matches the needed resources.

Call us we’re nice!

Two Halves of the Nutshell

The process for executing a lease on a CoresOnDemand cluster is quite straight forward. There are two parts to a lease:

PART 1: How many cores & how long is the lease for?

By working with the PADT engineers – and possibly benchmarking their models – customers can set a realistic estimate on how many cores are required and how long their models need to run on the CoresOnDemand clusters. Normally, leases are in one-week blocks with incentives for longer or regular lease requirements.

Clusters are leased in one-week blocks, but we’re flexible.

Part 2: How will ANSYS be licensed?

An ANSYS license is required in order to run on the CoresOnDemand environment.  A license lease can be generated by contacting any ANSYS channel partner. PADT can generate license leases in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah & Nevada. Licenses can also be borrowed from the customer’s existing license pool.

An ANSYS license may be leased from an ANSYS channel partner or borrowed from customer’s existing license pool.

Using the Cluster

Once the CoresOnDemand team has completed the cluster setup and user creation (takes a couple of hours for most cases), customers can login and begin using the cluster. The CoresOnDemand clusters allow customers to use the connection method they are comfortable with. All connections to CoresOnDemand are encrypted and are protected by a firewall and an isolated network environment.

Step 1: Transfer files to the cluster:

Files can be transferred to the cluster using Secure Copy Protocol which creates an encrypted tunnel for copying files. A graphical tool is also available for Windows users (& it’s freeJ). Also, larger files can be loaded to the cluster manually by sending a DVD, Blu-ray disk or external storage device to PADT. The CoresOnDemand team will mount the volume and can assist in the copying of data.

Step 2: Connect to the cluster and start jobs

Customers can connect to the cluster through an SSH connection. This is the most basic interface where users can launch interactive or batch processing jobs on the cluster. SSH is secure, fast and very stable. The downside of SSH is that is has limited graphical capabilities.

Another option is to use the Nice Software Desktop Cloud Visualization (DCV) interface. DCV provides enhanced interactive 2D/3D access over a standard network. It enables users to access the cluster from anywhere on virtually any device with a screen and an internet connection. The main advantage of DCV is the ability to start interactive ANSYS jobs and monitor them without the need for a continuous connection. For example, a user can connect from his laptop to launch the job and later use his iPad to monitor the progress.

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Figure 1. 12 Million cell model simulated on CoresOnDemand

The CoresOnDemand environment also has the Torque resource manager implemented where customers can submit multiple jobs to a job queue and run them in sequence without any manual intervention.

Customers can use SCP or ship external storage to get data on the cluster. SSH or DCV can be used to access the cluster. Batch, interactive or Torque scheduler can be used to submit and monitor jobs.

All Done?

Once the simulation runs are completed customers usually choose one of two methods to transfer data back. First is to download the results over the internet using SCP (mentioned earlier) or have external media shipped back (External media can be encrypted if needed).

After the customer receives the data and confirms that all useful data was recovered from the cluster, CoresOnDemand engineers re-image the cluster to remove all user data, user accounts and logs. This marks the end of the lease engagement and customers can rest assured that CoresOnDemand is available to help…and it’s pretty fast too.

At the end of the lease customers can download their data or have it shipped on external media. The cluster is later re-imaged and all user data, accounts & logs are also deleted in preparation for the next customer.

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ANSYS Launches Free Student Version

ansys-student-1This week ANSYS, Inc. made a fantastic announcement that has been in the works for a while, and that we think will greatly benefit the simulation community:  A free ANSYS Student product.  This is an introductory product that is focused on students who are learning the fundamentals of simulation who also want to learn the full power and capability of the ANSYS product suite.  It includes ANSYS® Multiphysics™ , ANSYS® CFD™ , ANSYS® Autodyn®, ANSYS® Workbench™, ANSYS® DesignModeler™and ANSYS®DesignXplorer™

Yes you read that right, all of the flagship products for free. No features or capabilities are turned off. It is the exact same software as the commercial product, but the size of problems that you can solve is limited.  It runs on MS Windows. Perfect for students.

PADT is excited about this because it gives students access to the ability to learn FEA and CFD simulation with the world’s most popular and capable simulation tool, without running in to brick walls. Want to do a flat plate with a hole in it? No Problem. Want to model fluid-solid-interaction on a flexible membrane valve? No Problem.  Want to model explosive forming? No Problem.  Want to model combustion with complex turbulence? No problem.

All in the same interface as students will use when they enter the work force or do research at University.

This is great news and we can’t wait to see what schools and students do with this access.

How to Get It – The New Academic Web Pages

The previous Student Portal is being replaced with an Academic Web area on the ansys.com site: ansys.com/academic.

Go to the ANSYS Student site to learn more about ANSYS Student and how to download your copy. These same pages will have resources to help you learn and understand the product.

The “Pictures”

Let me state categorically that PADT was not consulted on the image that ANSYS, Inc. used for the “student” user that was so happy to find out that there is now a free version of the ANSYS software suite.  Here is their picture:

ANSYS-student-version We would have preferred something like this:

huge.1.7907

 

Just kidding. We were happy to see this product come out and thought the picture was hilarious.  In all seriousness, we will also plug the  recent #ilooklikeanengineer twitter hash tag , highlighting the diversity of female engineers. that was awesome and we would love to see more chances for engineers to show their true selves.

 

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3D Printing the 4th Dimension – GISHWHES 2015 Scavenger Hunt

padt-sundial-insun-apple-watch-wGISHWHES is a huge international scavenger hunt. Every year teams around the globe comb through the list of 215 tasks and pick as many as possible that their team can do.  Last year they introduced 3D Printing as a task, and we helped a team 3D Print a quill pen. That was a lot of fun, so when this year’s list included an item on 3D printing, we jumped at the chance to be involved.

The item was:

110: VIDEO. Use a cutting edge 3D printer to 3D print your representation of the 4th dimension.62 POINTS

Being engineers we said “4th Dimension?  Time.”  Then it became a choice between the way mass distorts the space-time continuum or some sort of clock’ish thing.  The distortion thing seemed difficult so we focused on a clock.  Being that we were constrained on budget and time we decided to do a sundial.

The result can be seen here in this YouTube video.

It was a fun project and the team spent a bit of time in the 112F sunshine trying it out.  We can’t wait to see what we will get to do for the 2016 scavenger hunt.

Making the Model

A couple of people have asked if we downloaded the solid model for the sundial or if we made it. We actually made it. After a little bit of research we found that making a simple horizontal sundial like this one is very easy. Here are the steps we took:

Get Geometry Values

So it turns out that the angle of each hour line is determined by the latitude of where the dial will go. The angle of the pointy thing, called a gnomon, is also the latitude.  So for Tempe, AZ that is 33.4294°.That gets applied to the equation:

angle(h) = arctan(sin(L*tan(15° · h))

h = integer of the hour, 6 am to 6 pm
L = latitude

I plopped that into Excel:

=ABS(DEGREES(ATAN(SIN(RADIANS($C$3))*TAN(RADIANS(15)*B7))))

and got the following:

Latitude 33.4294
Hour Angle
6 90.00
7 64.06
8 43.66
9 28.85
10 17.64
11 8.40
12 0.00

Build the Solid Model

The next step is to build the model. I used SolidEdge because I know it real well and was able to knock it out quickly.  But all CAD tools would be the same:

  1. Pick a center point.
  2. Add lines as rays from that using the angles in the table above for each hour.
  3. Design the shape of your sundial to look cool. I did a simple circle .
  4. Mark the hours using the sketch. I raised up thin rectangles.
  5. Model the gnomon using the latitude as the angle.  Make this as fancy or simple as you want.
  6. Add whatever doo-dads you want.
  7. Label the hours if you want.
  8. Save to STL

Here is what my sketch looked like:PADT-sundial-cad-model-hour-sketc

And the final solid model looked like this:

PADT-sundial-cad-modelWe sent this to the printer as shown in the video, and got a sundial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Major Enhancements in FLOWNEX 2015: Combustors, Importers, and Pipes

FlownexLogo_OfficialSimulation has revolutionized flow and heat transfer dependent systems over the past decades by minimizing costly physical testing and accelerating time to operation around the world. But for many companies, such simulation has largely focused on components and proved to be very time consuming. The technology advancements delivered by Flownex SE now offer a fast, reliable, and accurate total system and subsystem approach to simulation.

FLOWNEX-2015-ICONS

With the release of FLOWNEX 2015, users now have access to advanced combustor system level modeling and they can interact with more system and component simulation tools. This is on top of the already considerable capabilities found in the  tool

Gas Turbine Combustor Heat Transfer Library

During the Preliminary design phase or when considering modifications to existing combustor designs it’s essential to make realistic predictions of  mass flow splits through the  various air admission holes, total pressure losses liner temperatures along the length of the combustor etc.

FLOWNEX-2015-combustor-simulationAlthough very powerful, 3D CFD solutions of combustors are specialized, time consuming processes and therefore are seldom exclusively used during initial sizing of a combustor.

It has been demonstrated that 1D/2D network tools, like Flownex, are capable of predicting with reasonable accuracy the same trends as more detailed numerical models.

The advantage, however, is Flownex’s rapid execution, which allows design modifications and parametric studies to be conducted more simply than ever before. The ease of use and incredible speed of Flownex allows 1000s of preliminary designs to be evaluated under all modes of operation for steady state and dynamic cases. Furthermore, the data obtained from the one-dimensional analysis can be used as boundary conditions for a more detailed three-dimensional model, ultimately supplementing a typical combustor design work flow.

While the simulation of combustor systems was previously possible in the Flownex environment, much of the work of implementing industry standard heat transfer correlations was left to the user through scripting .Now in Flownex SE 2015 it’s all been built in to the tool, while maintaining the flexibility required to model any combustor configuration.

New components include

  • Film convection component
  • Fluid radiation component
  • Jet impingement heat transfer component

To sum up Flownex allows more accurate initial designs, less time is spent on advanced 3D combustor simulations and rig tests, thus reducing development time and cost.

Here is a Video that shows off these features:

Added importers and integration features

AFT Fathom/Impulse/Arrow importer

An importer was added to import the file formats of AFT products. The importer imports all the diameters, loss factors heights, etc. so 90% of the effort is done, and in some cases the networks solve without any modifications.

ROHR2 Integration (pipe stress analysis software)

Flownex has the ability to calculate forces during dynamic simulations. This is very useful in pipe stress analysis for surge or water hammer cases. The ability to import complete geometries from ROHR2 and export results in the format that ROHR2 expects natively has been added. This means a user can perform these combined analysis now with ROHR2 with the minimum of effort.

Fluid Importers

An Importer was added to import liquid and gas properties from CoolProp an open source fluid property library. The existing Aspen/Hysys fluid importer was changed to be a generic Cape-Open compliant importer. This means that fluid properties can now be imported from any Cape-Open compliant server software.

FLOWNEX-2015-turbine-engine

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Donny Don’t – Thin Sweep Meshing

It’s not a series of articles until there’s at least 3, so here’s the second article in my series of ‘what not to do’ in ANSYS…

Just in case you’re not familiar with thin sweep meshing, here’s an older article that goes over the basics.  Long story short, the thing sweep mesher allows you to use multiple source faces to generate a hex mesh.  It does this by essentially ‘destroying’ the backside topology.  Here’s a dummy board with imprints on the top and bottom surface:

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If I use the automatic thin sweep mesher, I let the mesher pick which topology to use as the source mesh, and which topology to ‘destroy’.  A picture might make this easier to understand…

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As you can see, the bottom (right picture) topology now lines up with the mesh, but when I look at the top (left picture) the topology does not line up with the mesh.  If I want to apply boundary conditions to the top of the board (left picture), I will get some very odd behavior:

image

I’ve fixed three sides of the board (why 3?  because I meant to do 4 but missed one and was too lazy to go back and re-run the analysis to explain for some of future deflection plots…sorry, that’s what you get in a free publication) and then applied a pressure to all of those faces.  When I look at the results:

image

Only one spot on the surface has been loaded.  If you go back to the mesh-with-lines picture, you’ll see that there is only a single element face fully contained in the outline of the red lines.  That is the face that gets loaded.  Looking at the input deck, we can see that the only surface effect element (how pressure loads are applied to the underlying solid) is on the one fully-contained element face:

image

If I go back and change my thin sweep to use the top surface topology, things make sense:

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The top left image shows the thin sweep source definition.  Top right shows the new mesh where the top topology is kept.  Bottom left shows the same boundary conditions.  Bottom right shows the deformation contour.

The same problem occurs if you have contact between the top and bottom of a thin-meshed part.  I’ll switch the model above to a modal analysis and include parts on the top and bottom, with contact regions already imprinted.

image

I’ll leave the thin sweeping meshing control in place and fix three sides of the board (see previous laziness disclosure).  I hit solve and nothing happens:

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Ah, the dreaded empty contact message.  I’ll set the variable to run just to see what’s going on.  Pro Tip:  If you don’t want to use that variable then you would have to write out the input deck, it will stop writing once it gets to the empty contact set.  Then go back and correlate the contact pair ID with the naming convection in the Connections branch.

The model solves and I get a bunch of 0-Hz (or near-0) modes, indicating rigid body motion:

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Looking at some of those modes, I can see that the components on one side of my board are not connected:

image

The missing contacts are on the bottom of the board, where there are three surface mounted components (makes sense…I get 18 rigid body modes, or 6 modes per body).  The first ‘correct’ mode is in the bottom right image above, where it’s a flapping motion of a top-mounted component.

So…why don’t we get any contact defined on the bottom surface?  It’s because of the thin meshing.  The faces that were used to define the contact pair were ‘destroyed’ by the meshing:

image

Great…so what’s the take-away from this?  Thin sweep meshing is great, but if  you need to apply loads, constraints, define contact…basically interact with ANYTHING on both sides of the part, you may want to use a different meshing technique.  You’ve got several different options…

  1. Use the tet mesher.  Hey, 2001 called and wants its model size limits back.  The HPC capabilities of ANSYS make it pretty painless to create larger models and use additional cores and GPUs (if you have a solve-capable GPU).  I used to be worried if my model size was above 200k nodes when I first started using ANSYS…now I don’t flinch until it’s over 1.5M
    image
    Look ma, no 0-Hz modes!
  2. Use the multi-zone mesher.  With each release the mutli-zone mesher has gotten better, but for most practical applications you need to manually specify the source faces and possibly define a smaller mesh size in order to handle all the surface blocking features.
    image
    Look pa, no 0-Hz modes!Full disclosure…the multi-zone mesher did an adequate job but didn’t exactly capture all of the details of my contact patches.  It did well enough with a body sizing and manual source definition in order to ‘mostly’ bond each component to the board.
  3. Use the hex-dominant mesher.  Wow, that was hard for me to say.  I’m a bit of a meshing snob, and the hex dominant mesher was immature when it was released way back when.  There were a few instances when it was good, but for the most part, it typically created a good surface mesh and a nightmare volume mesh.  People have been telling me to give it another shot, and for the most part…they’re right.  It’s much, much better.  However, for this model, it has a hard time because of the aspect ratio.  I get the following message when I apply a hex dominant control:

    image
  4. The warning is right…the mesh looks decent on the surface but upon further investigation I get some skewed tets/pyramids.  If I reduce the element size I can significantly reduce the amount of poorly formed elements:image
  5. That’s going on the refrigerator door tonight!
    image
    And…no 0-Hz modes!
  • Lastly…go back to DesignModeler or SpaceClaim and slice/dice the model and use a multi-body part.image
    3 operations, ~2 minutes of work (I was eating at the same time)

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    Modify the connection group to search/sort across parts

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    That’s a purdy mesh!  (Note:  most of the lower-quality elements, .5 and under, are because there are 2-elements through thickness, reducing the element size or using a single element thru-thickness would fix that right up)

    image
    And…no 0-Hz modes.

Phew…this was a long one.  Sorry about that.  Get me talking about meshing and look what happens.  Again, the take-away from all of this should be that the thin sweeper is a great tool.  Just be aware of its limitations and you’ll be able to avoid some of these ‘odd’ behaviors (it’s not all that odd when you understand what happens behind the scenes).

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Tech Tips and Videos for Electromechanical Simulation with ANSYS Products

ansys_free_techtipsWe just recieved a new tech tip bundle from ANSYS, Inc on Electromechanical Simulation.  You may remember when we published the Mechanical and Fluids ANSYS tech tips a few weeks ago.  This latest kit continues with information for people making devices and systems that have mechanical and electrical systems.  The focus of the kit is the application of ANSYS Maxwell and Simplorer – Maxwell to model low frequency electromagnetics and Simplorer to model systems.

Here is a link to “The Electromechanical Simulation Productivity Kit ” here. The kit includes:

  • ANSYS Maxwell Automation and Customization Application Brief
  • ANSYS Maxwell Magnetic Field Formulation Application Brief
  • Electric Machine Design Methodology Whitepaper
  • Electromagnetics And Thermal Multiphysics Analysis Webinar
  • Rechargeable Lithium Ion Battery Whitepaper
  • Robust Electric Machine Design – ANSYS Advantage Article

We also have a collection of videos that are a great introduction to the tool set and how to use it. Check out the overview and the video on the washing machine at a minimum.  Even if you have a simple EMAG or do hand calcs, you need to look at Maxwell and Simplorer.

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Peeling Away the *VMASK

vmask-icon2One way to really unleash the power of APDL is to become familiar, and ultimately fluent, with array parameters. The APDL student will quickly learn that array manipulation involves heavy use of the *V commands, which are used to operate on vectors (single columns of an array). These commands can be used to add two vectors together, find the standard deviation of a column of data, and so on. *V commands consist of what I like to refer to as “action” commands and “setting” commands. The action commands, such as *VOPER, *VFILL, and *VFUN * have their own default behaviors, but these defaults may be overridden by a preceding setting command, such as *VABS, *VLEN, or *VMASK.

*VMASK is one of the most useful, but one of the most difficult to understand, *V command. At its essence it is a setting command that directs the following action command to a “masking” array of true/false values. Only cells corresponding to “true” values in the masking array are considered for the array being operated on in the subsequent action command.

For example, a frequently used application of *VMASK is in the compression of an array—for instance to only include data for selected entities. The array to be compressed would consist of data for all entities, such as element numbers, x-locations for all nodes, etc. The masking array would consist of values indicating the select status for the entities of interest: 1 for selected, –1 for unselected, and 0 for not even in the model to begin with. Only array cells corresponding to a masking array value of 1 would be included in the compression operation, with those corresponding to a value or 0 or –1 being thrown out. Here is a slide from our APDL training class that I hope illustrates things a little better.

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Take the class or buy the manual (and review it at Amazon, please!)

What we’ve learned so far is that the masking array contains a list of true/false (or not true) values to refer to when performing its vector operation. But actually, it’s much more general than 1, 0, and –1. What *VMASK does is include cells corresponding to all positive numbers in the masking array (not just +1) and exclude cells corresponding to all values less than or equal to zero in the masking array (not just 0 and            -1), which broadens the possibilities for how *VMASK can be handy.

Everything I’ve used *VMASK for up to this point in my career has involved array compression, and I figured I’d be put out on a sweep meshed ice floe into a sea of CFD velocity streamlines (that’s what happens to old CAE engineers; you didn’t know that?) before I came up with anything else. However, I recently ran into a situation where I needed to add up just the positive numbers in an array. I was about to construct an algorithm that would test each individual number in the array to see if it was positive and, if so, add it to the total. It would’ve been cumbersome. Then I came up with a much less cumbersome approach: use the array as it’s own masking array and then perform the addition operation. Let’s look at an example.

Take the following array:

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The sum of all values in the array is 1.5 whereas the sum of just the positive values is 11.5. What’s the most efficient way to have APDL calculate each?

In the case of summing all values in the array, it’s easy, just simply execute

*VSCFUN,sum_total,SUM,sum_exmpl(1)

which gives you

image

But what about summing just the positive values? That’s easy, just use SUM_EXMPL as its own masking array so that only the positive values are included in the operation.

*VMASK,sum_exmpl(1)

*VSCFUN,sum_pos,SUM,sum_exmpl(1)

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Boo yeah

Now why was I doing this? I had to create a macro to calculate total nodal loads for an unconstrained component in just the positive direction (to ignore the loads counteracting in the negative direction), and this was my approach. Feel free to download the macro: facelds.mac and try it out yourself.

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Video Tips: Topology Optimization with ANSYS and GENESIS

This video will show you how you can optimize a part using Topology Optimization with GENESIS through ANSYS Mechanical with support from ANSYS SpaceClaim

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Product Development for Startups – Presentation at The Startup Lifecycle Lunch & Learn

PADT-Startup-Prod-DevThis Thursday PADT was asked to help participate in a lunch and learn entitled “The Startup Lifecycle.” The event was a joint presentation of the Arizona Technology Council and the Maricopa Corporate College and it was held at CEI’s fantastic facilities.  Given our background, we were asked to talk about Product Development, and specifically on Minimum Viable Products and Lean Manufacturing Principles.

You can download my presentation here, or read on to learn more about the event.

lunchandlearn2There were four presenters.  Hart Schafer the Founder & CEO of TheraSpace and an experienced Adobe guy, among other things, kicked things off with a great discussion on customer validation and discovery.  He pointed out the common mistakes in thinking you know your customers and finding out you were wrong to late. Some great examples were given and he shared some practical ways to really find the Problem-Solution fit.

Next was yours truly, talking about those uncomfortable bits in the middle, where you need to actually design your product, then make it.  I covered the concept of a Minimum Viable Product and how to use product development to come up with one. We also touched on how lean product development can be applied in a startup environment.

Then I dived into lean manufacturing, which is a topic worthy of several Lunch and Learns on its own.  The bottom line was that Startups can effectively apply lean manufacturing to get a better product to market faster, and on budget.  I included some examples and advice on how to implement it.

As mentioned above, you can download my presentation here.

This is a picture of me gesturing widely as I explained how a simple cake doughnut is a Minimum Viable Product and one with frosting and sprinkles was not.  All the time hearing Homer Simpson saying “doooonuts” in my head. presenting2

 

NExt up was Nate Curran, the Entrepreneur-in-Residence at CEI.  He went in to how to commercialize a product.  Another huge topic, but he boiled it down to some basics on commercialization, marketing, and sales.  The last speaker was Russ Yelton, the CEO of Pinnacle Transplant Technologies, a successful startup that was a client at CEI. After we talked about what you should do, he shared the real world and how to scale and grow. The big takeaway from his talk for me was the importance of people and culture when you scale and grow.

After a great Q&A session, we posed for a picture:

lunchandlearn-presenters

As always with events at CEI, the venue was great. And, also as always with AZ Tech Council events, the audience was smart, engaged, and full of their own ideas worth sharing.  Yet another indication of the growing and improving startup ecosystem in Arizona.

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Two Fantastic Events for Start-Ups: Synapse Med Device Workshop and Star-Up Lifecycle Lunch and Learn

shutterstock_startups1As a further sign of the growth in the Phoenix Start-Up community, there are two high value events for Start-ups that everyone should be aware of, and it doesn’t hurt that PADT is a key participant in both.

Start-Up Strategiesaztc-startup-lunch-and-learn

The first is a lunch and Learn: “The Start-Up Lifecycle – Key Strategies for Success at All Stages of Development.” This event is being presented by the Maricopa Corporate College and AZTC’s Startup + Entrepreneurship Committee and will be held at CEI’s fantastic facilities. Most technology-based start-up companies go through a similar growth lifecycle: validation; product development; commercialization; scale. In this presentation, CEI will discuss the basic principles of business development for companies at all stages. Topics that will be covered include:

  • Lean Startup / Customer Discovery
  • Prototyping and Minimum Viable Product
  • Go-to-Market Strategies
  • Growth Management
  • and more!
Maricopa-Corporate-College-Logo cei_logo

The presenter are experienced entrepreneur’s who will share the lessons they have learned in their own companies and while helping others:

  • Jeff Saville, Executive Director, CEI
  • Nate Curran, Entrepreneur-in-Residence, CEI
  • Hart Shafer, CEO/Founder, Theraspecs & Lean Startup/Innovation coach
  • Eric Miller, Principal, Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies (PADT)

Learn more here or register here.

The Details:

Location
CEI Gateway
275 N. Gateway Dr
Phoenix, AZ 85034
Date & Time
Thursday June 25, 2015
11:30AM – 1:00PM
Cost
AZTC Members, Free
Non-Members, $15

Medical Device Workshopsynapse-logo1

PADT is also honored to be a participant in SYNAPSE 2015.  This unique event is a 3-day workshop aimed at medical professionals with a product idea.   The event will be an opportunity for them to work with industry professionals, like PADT, to turn those ideas into something real and tangible.  This is being lead by Medicoventures and will also be held at CEI.

synapseworkshop-1At the end of the three days attendees will have a prototype, secure intellectual property, and a vetted business model. They will also have a new network of resources and an invaluable education in the realities of Medical Device Start-Ups.

Other Resource sponsors besides PADT currently include: PipelineDesign; Global Patent Solutions; Knobbe-Martens IP Law; Schmeiser, Olsen & Watts IP Law; VA Angels; DLA Piper, and MedicoLabs.

This event is September 17, 18, and 19th.

This post only summarizes what will happen at the workshop, so please visit the website here to get the full details.

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AmCon Phoenix 2015: Comments and Presentation Notes

prezo_padt_amcon_phoenix-2015We just finished up our third and final AmCon show of the year at what turned out to be the best show of the three.  The PADT booth was packed during the exhibition time with a wide variety of people asking questions and checking out examples of what PADT and Stratasys can do.  We were able to meet with a lot of our local customers, and even better, were able to get to know a ton of new potential clients.  Some shows are kind of boring and people just don’t get what we do. AmCon shows are the exact opposite. The attendees are smart, informed, and eager to learn more.

As is usual, we had a collection of parts on display. We also had a Geomagic Capture scanner showing off our growing offering of optical scanning solutions.  Here is a picture of Mario at the show.  He definitely photographs the best:

mario_padt_amcon_phoenix-2015In addition to the booth, we were asked to speak on 3D Printing at the event.  Yours truly gave a presentation entitled: “The Practical Application of 3D Printing for Prototyping, Tooling, and Production” that lasted a bit over an hour.

As promised the notes from that presentation can be downloaded here.

We hope to see more of you at future events. If you have questions about 3D Printing and its application please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

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Vibro-Acoustics Analysis in ANSYS Mechanical as Told by a Structures Guy

Vibro-Acoustics-ANSYS-iconWith the introduction of ACT, the ANSYS Workbench editors have gained capabilities and shortcuts at much faster rate than what can be introduced in a development cycle. One of first and most far-reaching extensions is the acoustics. Inevitably I was called on by one of our customers to show them how to do a vibro-acoustics analysis (harmonic with acoustic excitation), which I did. Since the need for this type of analysis is quite broad, I’ll share it here too.

There was an extra level of excitement with this, in that I’m a structures specialist with no prior acoustics experience. So, I did my own self-training on this topic. I have to give tons of credit to Sheldon Imaoka of ANSYS Inc., who took the time to thoroughly answer the questions I had. That being said, this article will be from the standpoint of a structures engineer who’s just recently learned acoustics.

The first thing you’ll need to do is download the Acoustics extension from the Downloads section at the ANSYS Customer Portal and install it in Workbench.

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It’s at the very top, under ‘A’ for “Acoustics”

One thing you’ll notice when you unzip the Acoustics Extension package is that it contains and entire Acoustics training course. Take advantage of this freebie when learning acoustics analysis. I’ll note that, most of the process outlined in this article comes from the Submarine workshop in the acoustics training course.

Once you’ve installed and turned on the Acoustics extension, insert a Harmonic Analysis system into the project schematic, link to the solid geometry file, and specify the material properties for the solid. You’ll specify the properties for the acoustic region in Mechanical under the appropriate Acoustics extension objects.

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Rename as you see fit

Assuming you just have the geometry for the solid and not the acoustics domain, create two acoustics regions around the solid. The first region, surrounding the solid, will function as the fluid region itself, through which the acoustic waves travel and interact with the structure. The second region, surrounding the first acoustics region, will function as the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML). The PML essentially acts as the infinite boundary of the system. (If you’re an electromagnetics expert, you already know this and I’m boring you.) You can easily create these domains using the enclosure tool in DesignModeler.

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Acoustics Regions

Now we’re ready for the analysis. Open up Mechanical. Look at all those buttons on the Acoustics toolbar! Yikes! Fortunately we just need a few of them.

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Here they are

Insert an Acoustic Body and scope it to the acoustic region surrounding the structural solid. In the Details, enter the density and speed of sound for the fluid. Also set the Acoustic-Structural Coupled Body Options to Coupled With Symmetric Algorithm.

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Pay attention to the menu picks, Details, and geometry scoping here and in the rest of the image captures

“Coupled” refers to coupled-field behavior, i.e. the mutual interaction between the structure and the fluid. You’re probably familiar with this. You need that, otherwise the acoustic waves are just bouncing off the structure and the structure isn’t doing anything. Regarding the Symmetric Algorithm: The degrees of freedom for the acoustic system consists of both structural displacements and fluid pressures, giving you an asymmetric stiffness matrix. However, ANSYS has incorporated a symmetrization algorithm to convert the asymmetric stiffness matrix to a symmetric matrix, resulting in half as many equations that need to be solved and thus a faster solution time yadda yadda yadda, so go with that.

Now insert another Acoustic Body, this time scoped to the outer acoustic region (body). This is your Perfectly Matched Layer. Specify fluid density and speed of sound as before. This time, leave the Coupled Body Option as Uncoupled. But, set Perfectly Matched Layers to On.

 imageimage

Apply an Acoustic Pressure of zero to the outer faces of the PML body (Boundary Conditions > Acoustic Pressure). As you may have guessed from the menu pick, this is your acoustics boundary condition.

clip_image020imageimage

Now we’ll apply some acoustic wave excitation to this thing. From the Excitation menu, select Wave Sources (Harmonic). In the Details, set the Excitation Type to either Pressure or Velocity, set the Source Location and specify the excitation pressure or velocity value. In this example, I went with Pressure since that’s what MIL-STD-810 specifies, but this option will be based on your customer requirements. I also assumed an external acoustic source (hence, Outside the Model), but again, that will be based on your particular project. You also need to specify the vector of the wave source, via rotations about the Z and Y axes (f and q). In this case I chose 30 and 60 degrees, respectfully, to make it interesting. Once again, enter the density and speed of sound for the fluid.

clip_image026image

Insert Scattering Controls under the Analysis Settings menu and specify whether the Field Output should be Total or Scattered. Total gives you constant pressure waves that interact with the solid but not each other. Scattered gives you wave that interact and interfere with each other as well as the solid.

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Set up the Fluid-Structural Interaction boundary condition where the structural faces are “wetted” by the acoustic domain. The FSI Interface is found under the Boundary Conditions menu.

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Apply structural constraints and specify harmonic analysis settings just like you would with a standard harmonic analysis. Make sure you request Stresses under the Output Controls. Solve the model.

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Plot your structural results as you would for a typical harmonic analysis. Acoustic Pressure wave results may be found under the Results menu in the Acoustics toolbar. If you used Total field output for the scattering option, you can verify your wave source direction by looking at the Acoustic Pressure Contours. Keep in mind that the contours will be orthogonal to the axis of the sine wave; you may need to put some extra spatial thought into it to fully understand what’s going on.

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Acoustic Pressures: Field Output = Total

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Acoustic Pressures: Field Output = Scattered

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Von-Mises Stresses, Max Over Phase: Field Output = Scattered

As you’ll note in the training course, there are a number of design questions that can be answered with acoustics analysis. In this article, I’ve addressed what I thought would be one of the more popular applications of acoustics simulation. If the demand is there, I’ll research and compose more articles on various acoustics applications in the future. For instance, another area I’ve examined is natural frequencies of a structure that’s submerged in a fluid. If there’s another acoustics topic you’d like us to write about, please let us know in the comments.

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Instructions for Installing and Configuring ANSYS MAXWELL and PExprt, Versions 16.X

ANSYS_pexpert_maxwell-1ANSYS PExpert is a fantastic tool for the design, modeling, and analysis of transformers and inductors. Using a combination of classical and finite element analysis (FEA) techniques, ANSYS PExprt determines the core size and shape, air gaps, and winding strategy for a given power converter topology. What we and our customers have found very useful is the ability to then evaluate the magnetic design in ANSYS Maxwell to view such things as flux density in the core and current density distribution in the windings. Powerful stuff.

The first step in implementing ANSYS PExprt with ANSYS Maxwell is installing and configuring them correctly.  We created a step-by-step guild for our ANSYS customers here in the Southwest, and thought others would find it useful.

ansys-maxwell-pexprt-install-image

Download: InstallingMaxwellandPExprt16.pdf

As always, feel free to contact us if you have any questions or need more information. Also, even if you are not in our sales area, please consider using PADT for consulting or training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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