Simulate Moving Parts Faster & Easier with Overset Mesh – Webinar

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Mission to the Moon: Stratasys Joins Forces with Lockheed Martin and PADT to Engineer Advanced 3D Printed Parts For NASA’s Orion Mission

Sometimes we get to help on some very cool projects and helping Lockheed Martin and NASA leverage Additive Manufacturing Technology from Stratasys on their Orion Mission is one of those special opportunities that we will never forget.  The right combination of material and 3D Printer allowed the team to create functional parts for the Orion vehicle as it prepares to journey to the moon and beyond.

Working with Stratasys, Lockheed Martin, and NASA has been rewarding and we are honored to have been part of this historic project.  I could go on and on, or you could read the details in the press release below.

A link to a PDF version is here.

PADT is unique in the world of 3D Printing because of our in-depth technical knowledge and experience. We don’t just print parts or sell machines, we provide world-class design, simulation, and testing services as well. That how we are able to contribute to projects like this.  If you are facing engineering challenges of any kind, and especially if you working to adopt 3D Printing technology to your engineering projects, just give us a call at 480.813.4884 or send an email to info@padtinc.com.

Press Release:

Mission to the Moon: Stratasys Joins Forces with Lockheed Martin and PADT to Engineer Advanced 3D Printed Parts For NASA’s Orion Mission

Stratasys 3D printers and materials provide extremely high levels of strength, durability and thermal properties to power missions to deep space

Variant of new Stratasys Antero™ 800NA, PEKK-based material offers electro-static dissipative (ESD) functionality for advanced mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties

Minneapolis, MN & Rehovot, Israel and TEMPE, AZ., April 17, 2018 – Stratasys Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), a global leader in applied additive technology solutions, and Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) jointly announced the companies are teaming with Lockheed Martin Space to deliver next-generation 3D printed parts for NASA’s Orion deep-space spacecraft. Key to the project are Stratasys advanced materials – including an ESD variant of the new Antero™ 800NA, a PEKK-based thermoplastic offering high performance mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties.

The Orion spacecraft leverages a variant of new Stratasys Antero 800NA to build an intricately-connected 3D printed docking hatch door

Orion is NASA’s spacecraft that will send astronauts to the Moon and beyond. Orion’s next test flight, dubbed Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), will be the first integration mission with the world’s most powerful rocket, the Space Launch System, where an un-crewed Orion will fly thousands of miles beyond the Moon during an approximately three week mission.

The following flight, EM-2, will also go near the Moon, but with astronauts on-board, a first since 1972 and will enable NASA to prepare for increasingly complex missions in deep space. The mission will use more than 100 3D printed production parts on board – engineered in conjunction with Lockheed Martin, Stratasys and PADT.

The production-grade, thermoplastic 3D printed parts on NASA’s Orion vehicle are produced at the Additive Manufacturing Lab at Lockheed Martin in conjunction with PADT, which now includes the latest in Stratasys 3D printers and materials. Using advanced materials such as ULTEM 9085 and the new Antero material incorporating critical electro-static dissipative (ESD) functionality – NASA could meet key requirements for 3D printed parts to perform in the extremes of deep space. Antero is ideally suited to meet NASA’s requirements for heat and chemical resistance, along with the ability to withstand high mechanical loads.

“Working with PADT, Stratasys, and NASA has enabled us to achieve highly consistent builds that move beyond the realm of prototyping and into production,” said Brian Kaplun, Manager of Additive Manufacturing at Lockheed Martin Space. “We’re not just creating parts, we’re reshaping our production strategy to make spacecraft more affordable and faster to produce.”

Lockheed Martin is one of the first customers leveraging Stratasys’ Antero material – a PEKK-based thermoplastic with advanced mechanical, chemical and thermal properties.

The Lockheed Martin, Stratasys and PADT-engineered collaboration is differentiated by an ability to create consistency and repeatability in mass scale across the entire additive manufacturing part production process. Lockheed Martin is also one of the first customers leveraging Stratasys’ Antero, using the new thermoplastic for a critical part situated just outside of Orion’s docking hatch. The complex part consists of six individual 3D printed components locked together to form a ring on the craft’s exterior. The part is currently on display in the Lockheed Martin booth #603 at the 34th Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, CO April 16-19.

“The demands of space travel require extremely high performance materials and the most rigorous manufacturing processes in the industry. Part integrity and repeatability are essential and must pass NASA’s demanding testing and validation process,” said Scott Sevcik, Vice President of Manufacturing at Stratasys. “Based on decades of experience delivering strong and lightweight additive manufacturing solutions for leaders across the aerospace industry, Stratasys technology is ideally suited to match the high-reliability manufacturing processes required for production parts in space exploration.”

“It’s exciting to be a part of the Orion mission and Lockheed Martin’s efforts to transition additive manufacturing from prototyping to production,” said Rey Chu, Principal and Co-Owner at PADT. “Additive manufacturing technology and materials have come a long way to become a full-fledged end-use manufacturing option.”

PADT is currently joining Stratasys in their booth #537 at this week’s 34th Space Symposium. For further detail on how Stratasys is transforming aerospace and space exploration through 3D printing please visit: http://www.stratasys.com/aerospace.

Stratasys (NASDAQ: SSYS) is a global leader in applied additive technology solutions for industries including Aerospace, Automotive, Healthcare, Consumer Products and Education. For nearly 30 years, a deep and ongoing focus on customers’ business requirements has fueled purposeful innovations—1,200 granted and pending additive technology patents to date—that create new value across product lifecycle processes, from design prototypes to manufacturing tools and final production parts. The Stratasys 3D printing ecosystem of solutions and expertise—advanced materials; software with voxel level control; precise, repeatable and reliable FDM and PolyJet 3D printers; application-based expert services; on-demand parts and industry-defining partnerships—works to ensure seamless integration into each customer’s evolving workflow. Fulfilling the real-world potential of additive, Stratasys delivers breakthrough industry-specific applications that accelerate business processes, optimize value chains and drive business performance improvements for thousands of future-ready leaders. Corporate headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota and Rehovot, Israel. Online at: www.stratasys.com, http://blog.stratasys.com and LinkedIn.

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies (PADT) is an engineering product and services company that focuses on helping customers who develop physical products by providing Numerical Simulation, Product Development, and 3D printing solutions. PADT’s worldwide reputation for technical excellence and experienced staff is based on its proven record of building long-term win-win partnerships with vendors and customers. Since its establishment in 1994, companies have relied on PADT because “We Make Innovation Work”. With over 80 employees, PADT services customers from its headquarters in Tempe, Arizona, and from offices in Torrance, California, Littleton, Colorado, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Austin, Texas, and Murray, Utah. More information on PADT can be found at www.padtinc.com.

Lockheed Martin, headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration, and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

 

 

Stratasys and PADT Media Contacts

Stratasys Corporate &
North AmericaCraig.Librett@stratasys.com+1 518 424 2497Joe.Hiemenz@stratasys.com

+1 952 906 2726

Europe, Middle East, and
AfricaJonathan Wake / Miguel Afonso, Incus Mediastratasys@incus-media.com+44 1737 215200
Greater China, Southeast Asia, ANZ, and India

Alison.Yin@stratasys.com

+ 86-21-33196051

Japan and Korea

Aya.Yoshizawa@stratasys.com

+81 3 5542 004

Mexico, Central America, Caribe and South America

Yair.Canedo@stratasys.com

+52 55 4169 4181

Brazil

Caio.Ramos@GPcom.com.br

Nando@GPcom.com.br

GP Communications

+55 (11) 3129 5158

 

For PADT

Alec Robertson
TechTHiNQ

Alec.robertson@techthinq.com

+585 281 6399

 

Eric Miller

Eric.miller@padtinc.com

+480 813 4884 x103

 

   

 

 

 

Phoenix Business Journal: 4 reasons why responding to emails in a timely way is good for business (and your karma)

The norm these days is to just ignore emails you don’t want to deal with. In “4 reasons why responding to emails in a timely way is good for business (and your karma)” I explore why this is not a good idea with four reasons that are real and have an impact on your business. Like it or not email is the primary mode of communication and we just need to deal with that.

What’s New & Exciting in Mechanical Simulation – Webinar

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The ANSYS Discovery Product Family in R19 – Webinar Recording

If you have any other questions, feel free to contact us at sales@padtinc.com or contact PADT’s Simulation Support Manager Ted Harris at Ted.Harris@padtinc.com.

My View: Self-driving car death a sad reminder of the importance of regulation

When someone loses their life, it is too late to start regulating a company’s behavior. The recent tragic death of a pedestrian in a collision with an Uber self-driving car showed that “Self-driving car death a sad reminder of the importance of regulation.

Since the feature is called, “My View” I shared my views on this topic in the Phoenix Business Journal. A little more editorial than my normal business/technology posts in the PBJ.

Forbes.com: Finding True Innovators Is Tough, But The Talent Pool Is There

We have learned the hard way that “Finding True Innovators Is Tough, But the Talent Pool Is There.” And that pool is in the much-maligned millennial generation. In this contributions to Forbes.com, in their Grad of LifeVoice section, I explore what we have learned about that pool and offer up four suggestions:
1. Look for proactive behavior
2. Seek and encourage diversity in your workforce
3. Ask for a creative leam, then encourage more
4. Reward people who challenge your thinking and make you uncomfortable

Phoenix Business Journal: Part 2 of Blockchain and Burning Bridges

Here are the two latest guest blogs in the Phoenix Business Journal:

Beyond the hype, understanding blockchain: Part 2

The latest tech trendiness is a technology for keeping track of transactions called Blockchain. Its popularity stems from the fact that it has some significant advantages over traditional ways of recording transaction.  It is also popular because people have made millions out of thin air using it to track the creation of cryptocurrency. “Beyond the hype, understanding blockchain – Part 2” looks at the downside of Blockchain.

Burning bridges with people in business is just stupid

As tempting as it is, “Burning bridges with people in business is just stupid.”In this guest blog I talk about my own experience of how keeping relationships you wanted to cut has paid off for our business.

Extracting Relative Displacements in ANSYS Mechanical

A recurring theme in ANSYS Technical Support queries involves the separation of rigid-body from material deformations without performing an additional analysis. Many users simply assume this capability should exist as a simple post-processing query(or that in any case, this shouldn’t be a difficult operation). “Rigid-Body” displacements implies a transient dynamic analysis (as such displacements should not occur in static analyses), but as we’ll see, there are contexts within static structural environments where this concept DOES play an important engineering role. In static structural contexts, such rigid-body motion implies motion transmitted across multiple-bodies. There are two important and loosely related contexts we’ll look at; zero strain rotations of the CG and those rotations combined with strain-based displacement.

The following presentation explains the issues including the math behind it, offers solutions including useful APDL marcros, and then gives examples.

The models and macros used are in this zip file: PADT-ANSYS-Extract-Dsp-Files

PADT-ANSYS-Mechanical-Extracting-Relative-Displacements-20180404

You can also download the PDF here.

Find this interesting? This is just a small sample of PADT deep and practical understand of the entire ANSYS Suite of products.  Please consider us for your training, mentoring, and outsourced simulation services needs.

Getting to Know PADT: Stratasys 3D Printer Sales and Support

 This post is the eleventh installment in our review of all the different products and services PADT offers our customers. As we add more, they will be available here.  As always, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to info@padtinc.com or give us a call at 1-800-293-PADT.

When it comes to delivering accurate, robust, and feature-rich additive manufacturing, commonly called 3D Printing, to professional users, one brand of systems stands above all the rest: Stratasys. For over a decade PADT has been a reseller of these outstanding machines in the four-corners states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. In fact, our leadership position in the Additive Manufacturing space is built on the foundation of our sales and support history with Stratasys.

Stratasys, The World Leader in Additive Manufacturing

There is one simple reason why Stratasys is the world leader in Additive Manufacturing systems and why so many of our customers keep buying Stratasys systems: They Work.  The whole point of 3D Printing is that you can go from a computer model to a real part as quickly and easily as possible. Stratasys has created a complete set of hardware, material, and software to make that happen.  For hardware, they offer two additive manufacturing technologies: FDM and PolyJet.

FDM, or Fused Deposition Modeling, is the most common technology because it is reliable, accurate and builds strong parts.  FDM was invented by Stratasys over 25 years ago and still forms the foundation of their product line.  It is a layered deposition process that melts a variety of plastics that are then extruded through a nozzle to draw the shape of each layer. From the desktop MakerBot machines to the industry favorite FORTUS 900, there is a machine that works for every need.  Recently, we have been selling a large number of F370’s to new an existing customers.  FMD systems come in a variety of sizes, speeds, costs, and most importantly, material options.  And best of all, the majority of FDM systems come with Stratasys’ patented soluble support material that makes support removal as easy as dropping your part into a cleaning system (many of which are made by PADT).

If you need greater refinement, the ability to change material, or color, then PolyJet technology is your ideal solution.  The power of PolyJet is that it uses inkjet print heads to deposit tiny dots of liquid material on a build layr. That material is then hardened with an ultraviolet lamp. What is cool is that you can have multiple inkjet print heads and therefore deposit a mix of material within a given layer. This allows you to make parts with very hard, or very soft material in the same build. Or, to mix clear and colors in the same build.  Our customers use Polyjet printers to make everything from accurate medical models of organs to molds for plastic injection molding.  No other 3D Printing technology is as versatile as the PolyJet machines from Stratasys.

The PADT Sales Experience

Lots of people sell 3D Printers. We know because we have been doing it for over fifteen years. And as the technology has become more popular, more and more people are getting into the industry.  Our experience and technically driven sales approach is why customers keep coming to PADT when they have so many choices.  Our sales team is not about this months sales goal. They are about building, and more often than not, growing our relationship with customers new and old.  We are all about understanding what you really want to get done, and then finding the right combination of Additive Manufacturing system, accessories, and software that will make it happen.

That expertise comes from the fact that we have been running a 3D Printing service since 1994.  We know the real world of Additive Manufacturing.  No other reseller can bring our expertise and experience to your aid.

Support that Goes Above and Beyond

Once you purchase a system, your journey with PADT hits full swing. Our engineers will help you install, train your users, and then be there when you need us for maintenance and repair. Or simply to answer your questions.  We recently won a series of competitive situations where customers had a choice of who to hire to support their Stratasys systems. They chose PADT over other solutions for one simple reason: we know what we are doing and we really do care.  Our team has driven through snow storms, stayed with machines late into the night, and personally shipped replacement parts just so they could get customer’s machines back online and running as quickly as possible.

Talk to PADT about your Additive Manufacturing Needs

ULA’s Kyle Whitlow demonstrates the ECS duct that was printed using FDM

Regardless of what systems you currently have, or if you don’t have any 3D Printing capability in-house, now is the time to talk to PADT.  We have never had a better offering of solutions in terms of price, performance, and variety of capability.  We are helping universities establish labs, Aerospace companies 3D Print hardware for launch vehicles, and consumer products companies shorten their design cycle.  It may be time for you to upgrade or add a new material or technology. Or maybe you just need some accessories to get more out of the equipment you have.  Regardless of where you are in your Additive Manufacturing journey, PADT is here to help you get more out of your investment.

Exploring the Value of Multi-Print 3D Models for Medical with Stratasys & Intermountain Healthcare

PADT’s Salt Lake City office has been involved with fulfillment of medical 3d Printing of several cases where customers are exploring the value of multi-color and multi-material medical 3D models by using the Stratasys J750 or the Connex 3. One of those cases was presented at the Mayo Clinic’s Collaborative 3D Printing in Medical Practice 2018 course, which was held in Arizona this year.

An Intermountain Healthcare facility in Salt Lake City needed help with 3D printing a patient-specific anatomy, as they were looking to better their understanding of the value of 3D printing using multi-color printer beyond their existing in-house capabilities. In the picture below, Rami Shorti, PhD., a senior Biomechanical Engineering Scientist at Intermountain Healthcare, wrote:

“A patient with a horseshoe kidney and multiple large symptomatic stones, who had failed Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Ureteroscopy Treatment, was used to evaluate the benefit of using different imaging modalities intraoperatively.” 

Working with us in Salt Lake City, Rami Shorti, PhD, prepared the patient-specific medical imaging segmentation, post-processing of the patient anatomy, and finally generated for us a 3D printable CAD model that we were able to print using a Stratasys Objet 260 Connex 3. Since our office is located just around the corner from the hospital, we were able to work closely with Rami to identify the colors and finish of the final part.

The Connex 3 printer was introduced in 2014 as the only printer in the world that could combine three different model materials in a single print pass. Most 3D printers can only print with one material at a time, which is one of the main reasons why this technology is preferred for medical use cases along with its added precision. In 2017, Stratasys introduced the J750, which again is an industry first, becoming the only printer in the world that can print 6 different materials at the same time.  Combinations of hard plastics and rubber materials allow for a range of shore hardness values along with the ability to mix three primary colors to print 500,000 different colors.

With a quick turnaround needed, we decided to use the Connex 3 and were amazed that we were able to print the parts in two batches. Within 48 hours of receiving the STL files from Dr. Shorti, we were able to 3D print, post-process, and deliver the parts in time for the surgeon to review the time-sensitive surgical planning guides using the mockup. To enhance the transparency of the parts, we simply applied a few coats of Rust-Oleum Clear Gloss to the 3D printed part.  Now we were able to relax and wait for it to dry.  Below is a picture of the finished products displayed at the Mayo Clinic event.

 “3D printing added a level of benefit because of its ability to showcase the stones, renal pelvis, and renal arteries and veins simultaneously through the image fusion step done in Mimics software and with the use of specific materials and contrasting colors.  In addition, its ability to be held and manipulated in space was observed to be beneficial especially for patient education.”

– Rami Shorti, PhD., senior Biomechanical Engineering Scientist, Intermountain Healthcare

PADT is excited to continue our work with Intermountain Healthcare, and grow this relationship as new opportunities arise to leverage multi-material printing.

From Ideation to Operation: The ANSYS Discovery Product Family in R19 – Webinar

Don’t miss this informative presentation – Secure your spot today!

If this is your first time registering for one of our Bright Talk webinars, simply click the link and fill out the attached form. We promise that the information you provide will only be shared with those promoting the event (PADT).

You will only have to do this once! For all future webinars, you can simply click the link, add the reminder to your calendar and you’re good to go!

Phoenix Business Journal: Three Posts: “It’s a mess,” Exploring Easy with Disney, and a look at Blockchain

Time does fly and I got a bit behind on posting about postings in the Phoenix Business Journal. So here are three articles we hope everyone finds interesting:

It’s a Mess

One of the most annoying aspects of modern business life is the proclamation: “It’s a mess.”  Complaining is fine, but there is no indication of what the problem is and no attempt at a solution.  Please read “Turning “it’s a mess” or “it doesn’t work” into positive change” to share my pain and explore some solutions.

Exploring Easy with Disney

In “Exploring Easy: How a visit to a Disney resort highlights the power of easy” I add to the series on how making things easy in business is just a good idea. This post looks at the pure genius of the Disney organization in making every aspect of their customer’s experience.

The latest tech trendiness is a technology for keeping track of transactions called Blockchain. Its popularity stems from the fact that it has some significant advantages over traditional ways of recording transaction.  It is also popular because people have made millions out of thin air using it to track the creation of cryptocurrency. “Beyond the hype, understanding blockchain – Part 1” I share what I learned about the technology that is Blockchain.

PADT Intern Wins NASA and ASME 3D Printing Competition

We are very proud of our Additive Manufacturing intern Austin Suder who just won Future Engineers “Two for the Crew” Challenge, presented by the ASME Foundation and NASA.  The challenge asked to invent a multifunctional object that combined two items into one for 3-D printing by crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As a winner he will receive a trip to Washington DC, a MakerBot 3D printer donated to the orginization of his choice, and best of all, his design will be printed on the ISS and used by the astronauts.

Austin’s design was a Carabiner Tool Clip that combined a way to easo;u secure a tool and hold the sockets and drivers that the tool needs.  After designing the part he then used simulation to iterate on the design with virtual testing, and then he 3D Printed a prototype on his home 3D Printer. Austin started this project by researching what problems the astronauts faced. He found that a big problem was that tools would drift off in the micro-gravity environment of the station.  This was annoying when they are working inside the station, and a critical problem when they are on a space walk.  He also realized that they used a separate “holder” to keep the sockets and screw driver heads that the tool needed. Using this knowledge he developed a simple to operate carabiner to secure the tether on the hand tool to the astronaut and then use that same part to hole the sockets and drivers.

But he did not stop there. He also learned what he could about the MadeInSpace 3D Printer  that is on the station, and adapted the design to make sure the printer could make easily. Austin then used simulation to make sure the design was strong and robust. Then he printed his samples on his own home printer.

Local Phoenix station ABC15 stopped by PADT yesterday to interview Austin and here is their story:

Much of Austin’s knowledge and skill comes from his involvement in his school robotics team, and he will be donating the MakerBot he won to that team.

We hare very proud of Austin’s accomplishments.  He works at PADT as an intern in the Advanced Manufacturing department focused on 3D Printing, doing CAD, running the machines, cleaning parts, and being our in-house expert on desktop 3D Printing.  He will be graduating from High School this year and attending ASU as a Mechanical Engineer.  We can not wait to see what he does next!

MSU Denver Shows off their Additive Manufacturing Lab

In November of last year we did a press release on new Additive Manufacturing Laboratory at Metropolitan State University in Denver. Since then all of the partners have been hard at work getting the lab up and running.  Last week MSUD released an interview with the University President about the lab as well as a tour of the lab.  It is a great look at how academia and industry are working together to push advanced manufacturing forward. Not just on equipment, but also with internships and value added engineering at the university.

Take a look:

PADT is proud to have been a key member of the team  and a continued partner for the lab along with Stratasys.

If you want to learn more about how PADT can help your company or university create partnerships like this or leverage 3D Printing in other ways, please contact PADT.  We love this stuff!